Steven Price

My book

Media Minefield


Guide to NZ Media Law

Official Information Act

Official Information Act


Bill of Rights Act

Media law resources

Feeds (RSS)


« | Main | »

Confessions of a tabloid journalist

By Steven | January 17, 2012

For those who just caught be on Nine-to-Noon, those who’ve read Nick Davies’ excellent Flat Earth News, and those who are just interested in what goes on behind the scenes at UK tabs, here’s an insider’s expose, from former Daily Star journo Richard Peppiatt, who gave evidence to the Leveson inquiry.

Highlights: journalists never take a bit of notice of the Press Complaints Commission Code, they don’t give a stuff about the odd ruling against them, many stories are basically just made up or exaggerated beyond recognition, and stories are cut to fit the ideology of the paper. Oh, Peppiatt was once asked to track down Susan Boyle and propose to her. (She told him to piss off).

You might also be interested in his resignation letter.

Topics: Media ethics | 2 Comments »

2 Responses to “Confessions of a tabloid journalist”

  1. ross Says:
    January 18th, 2012 at 10:53 am

    Peppiatt’s evidence is pretty shocking. I wonder how applicable they are to the media here. His following comment I suspect applies here too:

    “Tabloid editors often talk of the ‘shame’ they feel at a PCC adjudication, but – and I won’t pull any punches here – they’re lying. They couldn’t care less what the PCC thinks, or about having to occasionally print a three paragraph correction. The transaction between newspaper and reader has already occurred, and the effect of that story is rarely diminished by a retraction months later. Getting the occasional slap on the wrist was just a cost of doing business.”

  2. Number Eleven Says:
    January 27th, 2012 at 9:11 pm

    The Advertising Standards Agency is equally derisory. I made a complaint – once – about an issue that I had extensively tested before plucking up the courage to submit a complaint. The response I received was that I was peculiar and since I was the only person who complained … well, you get the picture. A similar response was received from an associate who had complained to the Press Council on an issue. The Press, it seems to me, love to berate the police, doctors, et al over the issue of “investigating themselves”. Pot, kettle, black I would respond.

Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.