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“Stop the romp”

By Steven | April 3, 2009

The beautiful and talented Claudia Geiringer debuts in the blogosphere with a plea to the Nats to take seriously their own Attorney-General’s legal advice about Bill of Rights problems with their legislation – and not railroad their dodgy bills through Parliament without allowing a decent chance to debate them.

[Update: Dean Knight weighs in here, making the important point that if Parliament expects the courts to defer to its evaluation of what limits on rights are demonstrably justified, it should, um, actually conduct that evaluation seriously. David Farrer also expresses concern that the Select Committee was bypassed.]

Topics: NZ Bill of Rights Act | 8 Comments »

8 Responses to ““Stop the romp””

  1. Andrew Geddis Says:
    April 3rd, 2009 at 7:05 pm

    Oh well. That’s that then. Another promising academic career ruined by the siren call of instant electronic gratification.

    Poor Claudia. She coulda been a contender.

  2. Parole (Extended Supervision Orders) Amendment Bill | Kiwiblog Says:
    April 5th, 2009 at 12:04 pm

    […] Tip: Steven Price No TweetBacks yet. (Be the first to Tweet this post)No tag for this […]

  3. ross Says:
    April 5th, 2009 at 10:16 pm

    Speaking to the substance of the Bill rather than the process, whether child abusers pose a risk depends on what sort of treatment they receive while incarcerated. If they receive appopriate treatment, the risk is low. Of course, the problem could be that offenders may feel they have no incentive to be treated…why jump through all the hoops when they’re going to be supervised upon release? But let’s face it, no offender is going to be supervised 24 hours a day, so in fact the risk may increase if more offenders refuse treatment.

    The Parole Board can keep an offender in prison if they pose an unacceptably high risk, so if the Parole Board releases an offender once they’ve served their full sentence, I am not sure why there needs to be supervision. If the offender poses a high risk, they should remain in prison, not released to be occasionally supervised.

    Another issue is resourcing. Are Corrections going to be resourced adequately to implement this policy? They don’t seem to be able to keep tabs on current parolees, so I don’t hold out much hope they will be able to do what the government expects of them here.

  4. Graeme Edgeler Says:
    April 6th, 2009 at 2:40 pm

    The Parole Board can keep an offender in prison if they pose an unacceptably high risk, so if the Parole Board releases an offender once they’ve served their full sentence, I am not sure why there needs to be supervision. If the offender poses a high risk, they should remain in prison, not released to be occasionally supervised.

    No, they can’t. Not if the person received a finite sentence. The Parole Board can force someone to stay in prison past their automatic release date – the time when everyone gets parole – and can force them to serve every day of their sentence actually in a prison, but once this time is up, the person must be let out.

    ESOs are thought to be required for these people – those who get finite terms, and then have to be released when that full term is up, but who perhaps haven’t been rehabilitated.

  5. ross Says:
    April 7th, 2009 at 11:19 am

    My understanding, Graeme, is that if someone poses a risk, they are not automatically released at the end of their sentence. There was a newspaper article recently about John Barlow and the writer said that Barlow could spend the rest of his life in prison if he continued to pose a risk.

  6. ross Says:
    April 7th, 2009 at 11:22 am

    Here is the link in which it says that Barlow could remain in prison until his death.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/2313565/Barlow-may-be-freed-soon-despite-concerns

  7. Steven Says:
    April 7th, 2009 at 11:22 am

    I’ll swing in here. Barlow had a life sentence. Anyone in on a finite sentence cannot be held in prison when that sentence expires. The Parole Board can, however, let them out early in some cases.

  8. Nicholas OFlaherty Says:
    April 8th, 2009 at 2:02 pm

    Gidday Steven, fyi I couldn’t see any rss on Claudia’s blog

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